Atomic Heart: Locating Your Saved Games Folder - MGW

Atomic Heart: Locating Your Saved Games Folder

Robots in Atomic Heart

Welcome, Comrade, to Mundfish’s Atomic Heart. In it, a cool-ass Russian spy enters a world that has been overrun by freakin crazy killer robots. When an inexplicable mishap causes the robotic workforce to go haywire and kill any human it comes across, it is up to Major Nechaev aka Agent P-3 to fight the mechanical menaces and save the day. Welcome to Atomic Heart.

 

Step into the agent’s shoes as he encounters all kinds of organic and metal monsters, interacts with an interesting cast of characters, and crafts all kinds of weapons. You’re going to need all of the firepower you can get to blast these robots to bits and get out alive.

 

Atomic Heart is available on PC as well as Xbox and PlayStation consoles. Regardless of what console you choose for your alternate-history Russian adventure, you might need to locate your save file at some point. I know looking for your Atomic Heart save data can be a pain in the ass. But don’t even sweat it, because we made something that will make that process less annoying for you. With this Atomic Heart save game location guide for PC, PS5, and Xbox, you will be able to find your data in just a few seconds. Don’t forget to bookmark this page in case you need to get back to that file in the future!.

 

 

Windows PC:

%LOCALAPPDATA%\AtomicHeart\Saved\SaveGames

 

 

PlayStation 4:

Settings > Application Saved Data Management > SAVED DATA IN SYSTEM STORAGE > Atomic Heart

 

 

PlayStation 5:

Settings > STORAGE > [Storage device] > Saved Data > PS5 Games > Atomic Heart

 

 

Xbox One:

My Games and Apps > Atomic Heart > Menu > Manage Game > SAVED DATA

 

 

Xbox Series X|S:

My Games and Apps > Atomic Heart > Menu > Manage game and add-ons > Saved Data

 

  • Mike Alexander

    Mike has been playing video games since he was able to hold a controller, having been fascinated by Sonic 2 on his mom’s Sega Genesis. That fascination and passion for the art form has grown exponentially nearly 30 years later, and he doesn’t see that fading away anytime soon.

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